Chelsea (CTG) collaborates with Oxford University to a develop single molecule biosensor

Building on the expertise in the Gene Machines group, led by Dr. Achillefs Kapanidis in Oxford's Biophysics department, and the industrial know-how of Chelsea Technologies, a project to build a compact device for single-molecule biosensing and then to develop its novel applications has commenced.

 

Single-molecule biosensing is a very exciting area with potentially wide-reaching effects on the clinical, environmental and food testing markets. Because single-molecule assays can detect analyte molecules one by one, they can have extremely good sensitivity. Combine that with the specificity of some biological molecular interactions, such as the complementary base-pairing of DNA, and you can build very specific, very sensitive testing platforms.

 

Currently these tests are carried out in Oxford on a large, custom-built platform that requires special training to use and maintain. The purpose of the collaboration between Oxford and Chelsea is to design a compact, user-friendly device of similar capability, initially for the research market.

 

"Chelsea has a long tradition of working with academic centres of excellence and we strongly support the aims of Oxford University's programme," said Dr John Attridge, Technical Director at Chelsea Technologies. "The collaboration will fuse Oxford University's expertise in single molecule detection techniques with our commercial experience in the development of fluorescence based analytical instrumentation."

 

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Chelsea collaborates with Oxford University to a develop single molecule biosensor

"Chelsea has a long tradition of working with academic centres of excellence and we strongly support the aims of Oxford University's programme," said Dr John Attridge, Technical Director at Chelsea Technologies. "The collaboration will fuse Oxford University's expertise in single molecule detection techniques with our commercial experience in the development of fluorescence based analytical instrumentation."